ICIS SIGMIS Doctoral Dissertation Award

Beginning in 1995, the ACM SIGMIS Doctoral Dissertation Award has been awarded annually to at least one outstanding MIS dissertation.  A separate call for nominations is forwarded each year through ICIS.  The award is announced and dispensed each year at ICIS.  Judges include the faculty who participated at the prior ICIS doctoral consortium and other faculty members from the discipline who would be appropriate given the content of the submissions.

Award Winners (1995 – 2016)

In 2016, the award was given to Julia M. Mayer, supervised by Quentin Jones, both of New Jersey’s Science and Technology University, USA, for the dissertation entitled “Mediating chance encounters through opportunistic social matching.” 

 

In 2015, the award was given to Roman Lukyanenko, Memorial University of Newfoundland, supervised by Jeff Parsons of Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, for the dissertation entitled “An Information Modeling Approach To Improve The Quality Of User-Generated Content.” 

 

In 2014, the award was given to Kevin Yili Hong, Temple University, supervised by Paul Pavlou at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA, for the dissertation entitled “Three Essays on Online Labor Markets.” 

 

In 2013, the award was given to Ben Eaton, supervised by Carsten Sørensen at the London School of Economics and Political Science, for the dissertation entitled “The Dynamics of Digital Platform Innovation: A Study of Modular and Architectural Innovation in Apple’s iOS.” 

 

In 2012, the award was given to Beibei Li, supervised by Anindya Ghose at New York University, for the dissertation entitled “Analyzing Consumer Behavior on Product Search Engines: Interplay between Search and Social Media.”  The First RunnerUp is Wietske van Osch, supervised by Michel Avital at Amsterdam University, for the dissertation entitled “Generative Collectives.”  The Second RunnerUp is Shachar Reichman, supervised by Gal OestreicherSinger at Tel Aviv University, for the dissertation entitled “The Quest for Content: How UserGenerated Links Can Facilitate Online Exploration.”

 

In 2011, the award was given for Ryad Titah’s dissertation entitled, “The Alignment of Business and IT strategy in Multi-Business Organizations,” completed at HEC Montreal.  His advisor was Henri Barki.  First Runner-up: Sean Hansen's "A Socio-technical Perspective on Requirements Engineering," supervised by Kalle Lyytinen at Case Western Reserve University.     Second Runner-up: Quianquian Liu's "How Do We Use Online Customer Review?  A Cognitive Psychological Perspective," supervised by Elena Karahanna at University of Georgia.

 

In 2010, the award was given to Peter J. Reynolds for his dissertation entitled, “The Alignment of Business and IT strategy in Multi-Business Organizations,” completed at the Australian School of Business, School of Strategy and Entrepreneurship. 

 

In 2009, the award was given to Nicholas Berente for his dissertation entitled, "Institutional Logics and Loosely Coupled Practices: The Case of NASA's Enterprise Information System Implementation," completed at Case Western Reserve University.  Additionally, we had second and third place recipients this year.  Second place was awarded to James Howison for his dissertation entitled, "Layered Collaboration: A Socio-Technical Theory of Motivation and Organization for Free and Open Source Software Development," completed at Syracuse University.  Third place was awarded to Hong Guo for his dissertation entitled, "For Whom the Bell Tolls: A Two-Sided Market Analysis and Public Policy Implications for the Net Neutrality Debate," completed at University of Florida.

 

In 2008, the award was given to Gal Oestreicher-Singer, for his work entitled, "The Visible Hand of Networks in Electronic Commerce" based on his dissertation completed at Stern School of Business, New York University.

 

In 2007, the award was given to Sinan Aral, for his work entitled, "Essays on Information, Technology & Information Worker Productivity," based on his dissertation completed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

In 2006, the award was given to Andrew Burton-Jones, for his work entitled, "New Perspectives on the System Usage Construct," based on his dissertation completed at Georgia State University.

 

In 2005, the award was given to Zan Huang, for his work entitled, "A Unified Recommendation Framework Based on Probabilistic Relational Models," based on his dissertation completed at the University of Arizona. 

 

In 2004, the award was given to Paul Pavlou for his work entitled, "IT-enabled dynamic capabilities in new product development: Building a competitive advantage in turbulent environments," based on his dissertation completed at University of Southern California.

 

In 2003, the award was given to Otto Koppius for his work entitled "Information architecture and electronic market performance," based on his dissertation completed at Erasmus University Rotterdam. 

 

In 2002, the award was given to Otto Koppius for his work entitled "Information architecture and electronic market performance," based on his dissertation completed at Erasmus University Rotterdam. 

 

In 2001, the award was given to Olga Volkoff for her work entitled "A Grounded Theory Process Model of Enterprise System Implementation," based on her dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario. 

 

In 2000, the two award recipients were Dr. Virginia Franke Kleist for her work, “Information Technology and Information Goods Intensity as Predictors of Organizational Expansion Activity,” based on her dissertation completed at University of Pittsburgh, and Dr. David Lawrence Paul for his work, “Telemedicine: A Study of Virtual Collaboration and Trust in Hypercompetitive Environments,” based on his dissertation completed at the University of Texas at Austin. 

 

In 1999 the award was given to Dr. Sabine Hirt for her work titled "Dynamics of Media Choice Behaviour in Multinational Organizations," and based on her dissertation completed at UCLA.

 

In 1998, the award was given to Dr. Ranganathan Chandrasekaran for his work, ”Understanding the Context, Process, and Outcome of Strategic IT Decisions,” completed at the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Ahmedabad, India. 

 

In 1997, the award was given to Dr. Mayuram Krishnan for his paper titled "Costs and Quality Considerations in Software Product Management," based on his dissertation work completed at the University of Michigan. 

 

In 1996, the award was given to Dr. Amarnath Prakash for his paper titled "Reducing Cycle Time Through Interorganizational Linkages: An Empirical Study of the U.S. Apparel Industry," which was based on his dissertation work completed at the University of Memphis. 

 

In 1995, this award was given to Sandra Slaughter for her Ph.D. dissertation work, "Software Development Practices and Software Maintenance Performance: A Field Study, " University of Minnesota.


Connect With Us :